Monthly Archives: December 2017

Pets and Your Vacation Homes and Condos

So you purchased a vacation home or condo and now you are trying to decide if you should allow pets. Ask yourself these questions:

  • Will I get more bookings if I allow pets at my vacation home?
  • Will renters not want to rent my vacation home because I allow pets at my home?
  • Do pets really damage vacation rentals?
  • If I say No Pets Allowed, can I really enforce that rule?
  • What type of pets should I allow if I decide to allow them?
  • How many pets should I allow?
  • Am I trying to rent my vacation home to guests with pet allergies?
  • If I decide to allow pets what should I do to minimize any associated risks?
  • After all is considered should I allow pets?

Here is my advice and suggestions based on 8 years of experience and owning 7 vacation rentals.

Will I get more bookings if I allow pets at my vacation home?

It has been our experience that allowing pets has increased our rentals. If you refuse pets, you will lose rentals to anyone who wants to vacation with their pet. It becomes a question of balancing the number of rentals lost due to refusing pets, by the number of rentals lost due to renters with allergies. They may be unwilling to stay if you occasionally have pets in your rental home. However, keep in mind we do have rules with respect to type of pet, number of pets, and activity of pets. We also have renters who bring pets and get them to sign a Pet Policy.

Will renters not want to rent my home because I allow pets at my vacation home?

Some renters will already have it in their minds that vacation rentals who allows pets are dirty, smelly and run down. You will not be able to change their minds, so do not even bother trying. Such renters would likely be problem renters anyway. Some renters with allergies will also avoid your home, but in our experience there are fewer of these than there are pet owners.

Do pets really damage vacation rentals?

While some pets do, the vast majority do not damage vacation rentals. You would never even know a pet had ever been there. Most pet owners who travel with their pets, have clean well kept homes. They expect their pets to behave in their own home and while on vacation. These kinds of renters will always ask if they can bring their pet to your home. These are not the renters and pets you need to worry about. Pets you need to be wary of are ones that are not used to traveling or even being indoors.

Unfortunately, there are some renters who seldom admit they are bringing a pet because they anticipate damage or at least a mess. Protecting yourself with a good pet policy is more effective than simply banning pets. Banning them will not ensure that renters would not bring them along anyway and try to sneak them in.

If I say no pets allowed can I really enforce that rule?

We do not come right out and say that pets are allowed at our vacation homes, but rather we ask renters to inquire about pets. We found this to work very well. Renters will then ask us about pets and we can find out what type of pet they intend to bring etc. We then are able to inform them of our pet policy and we ask them to sign the pet policy. I use the pet policy found on www.GoRentPro.com. This pet policy has everything I needed and could also be modified to suit my individual needs.

You can also ask for an additional security deposit for any renters who bring pets. It has been our experience that renters who told us about their pets were not the problem, but renters who try to sneak in their pets are the problem.

If you know in advance that certain renters will have pets at your vacation home, you can let your property management know. They can check for any problems while the renters are there, and also check more closely for evidence of damage after the renters check out. Inform your property management of any pets that will be staying at your vacation home. Insist that your management staff immediately report any unauthorized pets at your home.

What type of pets should I allow?

Most renters travel with a small dog or cat. Very few travel with a large dog because a large dog takes up so much room in a vehicle and usually that room is used for people and luggage. Renters that travel with dogs and cats will usually have them in pet carriers. Most renters do not want an unruly pet accompanying them on vacation.

How many pets should I allow?

How many pets you allow at your vacation rentals will depend on the size of your rental. If your home is a 3 bedroom 2 bathroom vacation home and the guest want to bring 4 dogs I think that is a bit much. Really, it will be up to you to determine if you will permit any exceptions but do so only if you are very comfortable.

After all is considered should I allow pets?

In most cases it is more profitable to allow pets than to refuse them. Most people who tell you they are bringing a pet are never a problem. It is often when they try to hide a pet, that you have problems.  It is generally better to allow pets and to insist on full disclosure. Have the renters sign the pet policy to encourage them to be responsible and to have a security deposit to ensure accountability.

When it’s all said and done,  I travel with my own pet. If you travel with your pet, you know how difficult it can be at times to find accommodation suitable to both your family and your pet. As a pet owner and rental home owner who sympathizes with this dilemma, I allow pets in my vacation home.

Pet Friendly Destinations

Thinking of traveling with your pet internationally? Here are the TOP TEN international destinations to travel with your pet, and information that will make entering these countries easy and without quarantine.

We are also including information that will help you pass through immigration with ease if you are visiting another country. Keep in mind that this information is subject to change. You can always send an email to Pet Travel inquiring about the latest requirements for travel to an international destination with your pet.

The travel industry knows that pets mean profits. The airlines also want your business as many as 95% of the world’s airlines will now transport your pet. If your dog or cat is small enough you can even take it in the cabin with you on many airlines.

The grand cities of Europe are all very pet friendly. Here are four countries and cities that deserve to be on the top ten list.

Belgium, France, Switzerland and Italy are four of the most pet friendly countries we have visited. Traveling with your pet in Europe is easy as there are no longer any borders, so you can travel freely. Distances are small between the cities and even between countries. Getting around is easy as almost all European trains, buses and ferries accept pets on board.

PARIS is easily the most pet friendly city we have visited in Europe. You can dine at any of the thousands of sidewalk cafes in Paris, and you will see pets sitting by their masters or under the tables in nearly all of them. What’s more, in this the city of lights well behaved pets can dine inside the restaurant with their owners.

On a Sunday morning you will see well-dressed men and women walking with their very well-groomed pets on a leash out for a Sunday stroll and headed for the nearby park.

Visit the Montmartre district where artists have set up their easels on the sidewalk. For a few francs an artist will create an original painting of your favorite pet.

Immigration into France: To take your pet into France from the United States, Canada, or Mexico, you need just three things. Your pet must be micro chipped with an ISO 15 digit microchip, be vaccinated for rabies, and have the EU form of a veterinary health certificate for France. The immigration officer will just pass you through.

LAKE LUCERNE in Switzerland is well known for its beauty and the quality of its skiing. Rent a chalet for you and your pet near the lifts and you will have a great ski vacation. Just down the street will be a sidewalk cafe with a pet under nearly every table. If your pet does not have a thick coat, you will want to purchase it a nice warm coat to wear.

While visiting Switzerland you will want to see the famous banking capital of Zurich. But Zurich is famous for more than banks it is the home to many of the famous watch makers and chocolatier’s.

Switzerland is one of those countries where pets are just a part of everyday life. Due to its location it is just a short drive in a rental car or by train to either France or Italy.

Immigration into Switzerland: To take your pet into Switzerland from the United States, Canada, or Mexico, you need just three things. Your pet must be micro chipped with an ISO 15 digit microchip, be vaccinated for rabies and have the EU form of a veterinary health certificate for Switzerland. The immigration officer will just pass you through.

BRUSSELS is also on our list of top ten destinations. Although your pet may not be welcome in the museums, it will be welcome almost everywhere else. This is a walking city, and if you stayed for a month you would never run out of different places to visit with your pet. There are magnificent parks everywhere, take a walk through the famous antique flea markets, or stroll into Belgium’s past at Cinquantenaire Park.

Have you ever ridden a Segway? They look like an oversized skate board with a handle and an electric motor. Brussels is famous for the availability of these little devices that will scoot you around the city at a speed suitable for your pet to run alongside.

Brussels is also known for its exotic night life but you will need to hire a pet sitter as pets are not allowed in the night clubs.

Immigration into Belgium: To take your pet into Belgium from Mexico you need just three things. Your pet must be micro chipped with an ISO 15 digit microchip, be vaccinated for rabies and have the EU form of a veterinary health certificate for Belgium. The immigration officer will just pass you through.

MADRID is one of Europe’s oldest cities and worthy of a ranking in our top ten pet friendly places to visit. This is a city of plazas with fountains and statues everywhere. Spaniards love their pets, and they will love yours too if it is well behaved and friendly.

Take your pet on a walk to the Plaza Mayor the so-called “aristocratic centre” of Madrid, home to the stunning Royal Palace, a 17th century monument that combines Baroque and Classical styles. Next to the palace you can find the Plaza de Oriente (square), the Opera House and the modern Almudena Cathedral, consecrated in 1993 by Pope John Paul II.

Another option while visiting Spain is the beautiful Costa del Sol with beautiful white sand beaches running as far as the eye can see. And yes, your pet will be welcome on most of the beaches in the area so if you have a water dog, they will have a chance to sample the warm waters of the Mediterranean.
Immigration into Spain: To take your pet into Spain from the United States, Canada, or Mexico, you need just three things. Your pet must be micro chipped with an ISO 15 digit microchip, be vaccinated for rabies and have the EU form of a veterinary health certificate for Spain. The immigration officer will just pass you through.

The hotels in Europe are much more likely to make your pet welcome as it is such a common practice to take ones pet along on holiday. Or, you can book a lovely home or apartment, which are readily available if you are staying for a week or longer.

PLAYA DEL CARMEN in Mexico is a great destination for the lover of brilliant blue waters and white sand.

My little Shih Tzu named Ruggles and I lived there for a while, and there was virtually no place he was not welcome. If you need exercise there is a small partially outdoor gym where Ruggles would lie in the shade and wait for me. Down at the beach were dozens of small patio restaurants where Ruggles and I would share lunch.

On at least one occasion, we took the deluxe inter-city bus from Playa Del Carmen to Cancun. Ruggles occupied the seat next to me. Not sure if it was legal but no one said a word about it either way.
Nearby by are the Mayan Temples of Chichen-Itza. I do not believe that pets are allowed inside the grounds.

Within two or three kilometers are several caves with underground pools of water. I saw several pets during my visit to these caves.

COSTA RICA is a popular destination for traveling pet owners. Going through customs with your pet is little more than a wave of the hand. If you are looking for exciting gambling and night life, then San Jose is the place for you. There are plenty of pet friendly hotels in the city.

Most people who visit Costa Rica head for the rural areas where tall trees, beautiful birds and magnificent waterfalls are around every corner. Of course, don’t forget the rain forest where the brilliant blue butterflies flitter about the lush vegetation. Accommodations in these areas are less elegant but you will find several who will welcome you and your pet.

Immigration: 
To enter pet friendly Costa Rica you will need a certificate of good health indicating that your pet if free from disease and has been properly vaccinated. Dogs must be vaccinated for rabies, distemper, hepatitis, lestospirosis, and parovirus, and cats must be vaccinated for rabies.

Rounding out our top ten favorite pet friendly destinations, we travel to the United States. You can bring your pet into the US with only a health certificate stating that it is healthy and has been vaccinated for rabies.

KEY WEST is probably the most pet friendly city in the States. This small town can only be called “laid back” where life goes at slower place. Your pet will be welcome in virtually every hotel, bed and breakfast and motel in the city. Every restaurant has an outdoor dining area where your pet will be welcome and some restaurants even allow small well behaved pets inside.

I visited the city a few years ago and while Ruggles and I were out for a walk I stopped in front of a somewhat elegant restaurant. I was studying the menu and the maitre de came out to speak to me. I asked if Ruggles would be welcome and his response was: does he like beef or chicken?

THE BIG APPLE – NEW YORK deserves a place on our list. It seems that everyone living in this bustling city has a pet. There are so many that the pet walkers will each have six or eight at one time on leashes out for their morning stroll. Sunday in Central park is doggie heaven. Your pet will meet and greet a hundred other pets during your stroll. Then you can stop at one of the outdoor cafes for “coffee and a roll”.

This is also the city for the elegant hotel and nowhere is pets more welcome than in an elegant hotel. The higher the price of the room, the more welcome the pet. However, there is a wide range of places where your pet will be welcome. Pet Travel lists over a hundred hotels that welcome pets.

A few years ago Ruggles and I stayed at one of the nicer hotels on Central Park. Late in the afternoon I went down to the bar for a cocktail and took Ruggles along. We were sitting in the bar when the manager came in. He gave Ruggles a little pat and said “I would much rather have a well behaved pet in my hotel than a small child who is not well behaved. ” This hotel, like many others, sent a bellman up to my room each morning to take Ruggles for a walk.

Some of the hotels in New York even have room service menus for pets!

ASHEVILLE, North Carolina well deserves a place on the top ten list. More than 50% of the accommodations in Asheville accept pets attesting to its claim as one of America’s most pet friendly cities. For the traveling pet owner who loves golf this is a top choice.

During the summer Asheville features a number of outdoor concerts, street fairs, and festivals where your pet will be welcome.

SAN DIEGO is only a short distance from our border. This metropolitan city on the ocean has not one but two “doggie beaches”. There are hundreds of pet friendly accommodations in the city and in the surrounding areas. On a recent visit with my new pet also a Shih Tzu whose name is Bear; we stayed at the Sophia Hotel which could not have been more pet friendly. The young women who manned the front desk always stopped to talk with Bear and even offered to babysit him.

Each day we walked to one of the dozen or so outdoor cafes for lunch or dinner. Almost the first thing they would do was to bring Bear a bowl of water.

BEING A COURTEOUS TRAVELING PET OWNER
The range of accommodations and traveling options available to the traveling pet owner continues to expand because these businesses recognize the value of your business. However, you have a responsibility to be a courteous and caring pet owner. Don’t let your pet be a nuisance by letting it roam loose or by barking. And, rule number one, be sure to pick up after your pet.

Choosing the Right Pet Cremation Option

Where will you go when the time comes to say good-bye to your beloved pet? Most people will go to their trusted Pet Care Provider who will hopefully usher them through this crossroads of emotion and decision making with love, support and dignity.

Surprisingly, this is not often the case. Recently when I picked up my dogs at the grooming salon, the dear lady shared with me that when she lost her most recent dog, her husband handled all of the decision making as she was just too emotional. After spending nearly $350.00, it turned out that he had mistakenly ordered a mass cremation and therefore this couple never did receive the ashes of their beloved pet. He was told by his Pet Care Provider “don’t worry, we will take care of everything; this is the option most people choose…” He had assumed, incorrectly, that he would be receiving his pets ashes in return.

While pet cemeteries have been available in many communities, burial within a pet cemetery can be a very expensive option. Many may still choose to bury their pet in their back forty but most communities now have very strict health department zoning restrictions on pet burial. Today families have become more mobile and may desire the ability to take their family pet’s remains with them when they re-locate or they may feel more comfortable with a visible, tangible memorial for their beloved pet. All are reasons that more and more pet owners are choosing cremation and as many as 70 percent of those owners are choosing to receive their pets ashes after the cremation. Just 10 years ago only 25 percent chose this option to receive the ashes back after cremation.

Knowing that cremation is your choice is not the last step in this decision. Many pet owners do not realize, as my poor dog groomer did not, that there are many options for the pet cremation and deconstructing these options and the variety of terms in use for these options is the most important aspect of the pet cremation choice. Pet cremation usually falls within three main categories; mass cremation, individual cremation and private cremation.

Mass or Communal Cremation – As the name implies this is the cremation of many animals at one time, within a single cremation session. Pet cremators (the actual pet cremation equipment) can be very large with a capacity of several hundred to thousands of pounds of weight. The animals included in a mass cremation may come from a variety of clinics, animal shelters, etc and when the cremation session is completed the ashes are gathered and taken away to be disposed of by the crematory company, generally in their private landfill. This option should be the least expensive option for the pet owner and is a sanitary and decent way to dispose of the pet if retaining the ashes is not desired.

Individual Cremation – The individual cremation is a source of much confusion for pet owners and often uninformed Pet Care Provider staff. Individual cremation simply means that the ashes that are returned to the pet owner are intended to be only the ashes of their beloved pet. Generally with an individual pet cremation, the animal is tagged with a metal tag and placed within their own individual metal tray within the cremator. Depending upon the volume of the particular cremator there can be many animals within one session, however the animals are identified and separated. When the session is complete, the ashes within each individual tray are processed, bagged, and readied to be shipped back to the Pet Care Provider or individual pet owner depending on the circumstance of its arrival to the crematory. Many pet owners believe that an individual cremation means that their pet was cremated in a single session by itself and then given back to them as a guarantee that these ashes are their pets ashes alone. The only way to make absolutely sure that is the case is with the following option and that is the Private or Witnessed Private Cremation.

Private Cremation and Witnessed Private Cremation – A private cremation provides the option for the pet to be cremated entirely alone within the cremation chamber or cremator ensuring that there are no other ashes mixed in with the singular pets ashes. Often there will be a tag with identifying numbers that will be placed on the pet and will go through the crematory process with him and returned with the obvious characteristics of the crematory process on the tag as an extra assurance. Many times the crematorium facilities will allow for a special blanket or toy to accompany the pet and some crematoriums now have waiting room facilities or facilities that allow for a witnessed private cremation.

Many of these Pet Funeral Homes even offer wonderful viewing areas and are set up to conduct private memorial services as well. Private cremations are becoming more popular as pet funeral homes are beginning to pop up across our landscape. Pet funeral homes often can arrange for pick up of the pet at the private home or Veterinarian facility as well. While all Pet Funeral Homes will make arrangements with the individual pet owner, sixty five percent of private cremations are from Veterinary affiliates so it is important to discuss with your Veterinarian what crematory company he has an affiliation with and/or does he have a pet funeral home that he would recommend if what you require is the absolute assurance that a Private Cremation will take place.

Pet Cremation costs vary greatly and are largely dependent upon the above choices and whether the arrangements are scheduled through an intermediate source such as the Pet Care Provider. Mass or Communal Cremation generally costs from $75.00 – $125.00, Individual Cremation can cost $100.00 – $200.00 and Private and Witnessed Private Cremations can cost as high as $500.00 or more depending upon whether the family chooses private pick up, private viewing and/or a memorial service. Many Pet Funeral Homes are offering preplanning and prepayment options to the pet community just as are offered in the human funeral business.

While it is a difficult subject to contemplate for every pet owner, it is best to be prepared with as much knowledge as possible before the time comes. Take the time to discuss your crematory options with your Pet Care Provider or with your local pet funeral home or crematory, make sure that you are clear on what it is they provide, have them describe their processes in detail and make sure that those services meet your expectations.

Patricia L. Moore is the owner and founder of Soft-Hearted Products LLC, the developer of the Soft-Hearted Pillow Pet Urn. When Patricia lost her 15 year old companion dog, Samantha, she chose cremation as her option. Her family has always been mobile and it was important to her to have a visible reminder of Samantha as well as a place to keep her near. Patricia soon realized that a traditional cold, hard urn to be kept upon a shelf was not an appropriate placement or tribute to Samantha; a dog who had never left her side for 15 years. Patricia created the Soft-Hearted Pillow Pet Urn.

A soft, huggable, beautifully designed pillow which encloses a pet’s cremated remains in a safe, secure included pouch that is tucked discreetly deep inside the pillow. The Soft-Hearted Pillow Pet Urn is made from a choice of beautiful, soft fabrics with decorator trim and can be customized with a pet’s name, important dates etc. The pillows are functional as a safe, secure receptacle for a pet’s ashes yet are discreet enough for any setting.

Prepare and Travel Comfortably With Your Pets

Whether you are traveling by air, car, train or foot, carefully consider the needs of your pet and thoroughly review the options available to you and plan accordingly. You should always consider your pet’s health, safety and preferences when deciding whether to take your pet with you or leave them home with a qualified pet sitter. If your pet becomes anxious, motion-sick or does not enjoy new and different situations, especially older dogs, then the best choice is often to leave them at home where they feel safe, secure and comfortable.

Always do what is best for your pet. If air travel is involved, then leaving pets at home with a good pet sitter is usually the preferred option. When you do travel with your pet, deciding what to take is always a good place to start. Depending on the mode of travel and the length of the trip, you will need to pack any necessary medications and medical records, especially if your pet has chronic health problems or is currently under a veterinarian’s care for an ailment. And the appropriate paperwork is essential if your travels take you across international borders (see the links below for specific requirements).

Then you will need the basics like food, food/water bowl, pet first aid kit, bed, leash, collar, required tags (ID and rabies), and grooming tools if your dog requires regular grooming, pet waste bags, crate, and toys (especially an interactive or chew toy that will keep them entertained). You will also need litter and a litter tray or disposable litter trays for your cat. Just in case, take a recent photograph along. It will be much easier to locate your pet if it becomes separated from the family if you have a photo to show people. And if your pet has an embedded ID chip you will need to have the phone number of the company and your account details so you can immediately contact them.

Your pet should have its own bag so you know where everything is and can grab items when you need them. Don’t forget to carry some water if traveling by car, and remember to take enough of your dog’s regular food for the entire trip. If you can’t find the same brand on the road, abruptly changing a dog’s diet can cause stomach upset and diarrhea, something to be avoided while traveling. It is always best to stick to their regular feeding schedule as well.

If you are traveling by car and your pet is unaccustomed to car travel, begin preparing in advance of any long trips by first getting your pet comfortable in the car and then take it on several local trips of increasing duration. This will help minimize the risk of motion-sickness and help it become accustomed to car travel. If your pet appears to be prone to motion sickness consult your vet. Your dog should never be allowed to ride in the passenger seat, on your lap or allowed to run loose in a moving car.

Always use either a crate or one of the available safety harnesses or other barrier systems to restrain your pets. Restraining your pet is as important to their safety as buckling up is to yours. Some states even require restraints on pets in a moving vehicle. Restraining your pet serves the same purpose as our seatbelts; they help protect your pet in the event of an accident and they keep them from distracting the driver or jumping out an open window. Restraining your pet also maintains control of your pet when you stop for gas or a snack.

Crate-training your pet at home pays big dividends while traveling Not only does the crate provide a safe place for your pet while traveling when secured to the seat or floor of the vehicle, but your pet will feel at home, safe and secure in their comfortable crate wherever your travels take you. And crates are the most effective way of restraining cats and small dogs in a moving vehicle. Your local pet store will carry a variety of styles, sizes and makes.

For larger dogs, or if your pet prefers, there are also pet restraints available that work with your car seat belts or cordon off part of your vehicle. There are a wide variety of styles and types including harnesses, seat belt attachments, car booster seats, and screens and netting that create an internal barrier in your vehicle. Whichever method you choose, make sure it fits your pet and car, is comfortable and your pet will tolerate wearing it for hours at a time. And keep your pet’s head inside the car window to avoid eye injuries. Stop every two hours; this is advisable for you as well as your pets. Stretch your legs and take a walk. Be a responsible pet owner and don’t forget the pet waste bags and antibacterial wipes. Finally, never leave your pet alone in a parked car. They may attract thieves and can easily become overheated and distressed even on a cool day.

Traveling by air is always stressful for an animal so visit your vet well in advance of the planned trip to make sure your pet is physically fit and don’t fly your pet unless it’s absolutely necessary. But if you must, always check with the specific airline carrier and ask about all regulations (see the websites below for more information). Find out what their requirements are including quarantine periods at your destination and if your pet qualifies to ride in the cabin or must be sent as checked baggage. You will need to determine the container requirements, check-in times and health documentation needs as well. Always use a good quality container in good condition; many mishaps occur every year from pets traveling in damaged or poor quality containers.

If your pet must travel as checked luggage use a direct flight and travel on the same plane as your pet. Don’t travel when temperatures are forecast to be above 85 degrees F or below 45 degrees F. When you book your flight ask the airline if you will be allowed to watch your pet being loaded and unloaded and when you check-in, request that you be allowed to do this. After you’ve boarded, notify the Captain and the head flight attendant that your pet is in the cargo area. If your flight departure is delayed or has to taxi for longer than normal, ask that they check the temperature in the cargo area and report back to you.

Even if you know that your pet is a nervous flyer it is not advisable in most situations to use sedatives to calm them. According to the American Humane Society and the American Veterinary Medical Association, sedatives for air travel are not recommended because it is much more difficult for an animal to regulate their body temperature and maintain their balance and equilibrium if they’ve been sedated. Because of the altitude and temperature of a plane’s cargo area pets that fly in the cargo area are also more susceptible to respiratory and cardiovascular problems if sedated.

Before any trip get your pet’s papers and medications in order. Learn about the area you will be visiting in case there are diseases or hazards foreign to you and your pets. Your veterinarian can give you advice if you will need any additional vaccinations or medications. Have your vet perform a routine examination on your pet. Get any required legal travel documents (for air travel, contact the airlines for specifics that you’ll need to give to your vet), make sure your pet’s vaccinations are up-to-date, and get any medications your pet might need during the trip.

If you’re giving your pet medication specifically for travel test them on your pet several days before you travel to ensure the dosage is accurate and that there are no adverse side effects. Depending on where you’ve been, another examination by your vet after your trip might be a good idea to check for parasites such as, roundworms, tape worms, hookworms, heartworms, ticks and fleas, that were picked up while you were away.

If you are traveling overseas there are very strict and detailed regulations for transporting pets. Be sure to follow the vaccination requirements exactly. You don’t want your family pet to undergo any unnecessary quarantine periods. Pets are an important part of the family so be sure to take the time to plan and properly prepare them for the family vacation. By planning ahead and knowing what to pack, what to expect, and what to do each step of the way, you will ensure that your pet has a safe and stress-free holiday.

Personalized Pet Blanket

Are you looking for a personalized pet blanket? Do you want a blanket with your dog’s name on it? Do you need a blanket with your cat’s name on it for a gift? Personalize that blanket with these tips.

People really don’t mind spending for their pets. At least, that’s what the pet lovers at the Animal Pet Products Manufacturing Association (APPMA) say. Pet product manufacturing is a $35 billion per year industry. Who would have ever thought that people could spend so much on pets?

Well, if you are a pet lover too, then you might understand the feeling. Pet owners typically spend $250 on their pets – for items that can be personalized. These items include blankets leashes, pet bowls, and others.

Pets are more like family members nowadays. There are even people who get offended when their pets are referred to as an ‘it’. They would rather that they be called a ‘he’ or a ‘she’. Each pet is unique and has an endearing personality that is his or hers alone.

This has led to an increase in the need for veterinarians, pet grooming stores, and other services (and who hasn’t heard of the pet hotels stars get to pets in). Given this, giving pets gifts has become extremely fad. And building on that thought, giving friends gifts intended for their pets has become a fad as well.

Blankets are a great choice for pets nowadays – especially ones that can be personalized. If you are looking to give a friend a gift for their pets, a personalized blanket can be the epitome of thoughtfulness and generosity.

1. Pet blankets are an intimate gift. Pet blankets make perfect gifts because they show the recipients that you have an intimate knowledge of their loves – in this case, the pet. Also, knowing the pet’s name, and having the name embroidered on the blanket shows your interest in the things the person loves.

You could also consider getting matching stuff for the pet and the owner. Such gifts are hard to ignore and aside from actually being useful, they gain a great deal of sentimental significance immediately.

2. Pet blankets bring a great measure of comfort to the pet. Loving your pet means giving him or her the best that money can buy. And no self-respecting pet owner would like to give anything to their pet that wasn’t unique. This is where pet blankets come in.

While most pets can basically live without blankets – their ancestors used to live out in the wild, remember – they make cold, drafty nights a lot more bearable. You wouldn’t want your pet to lay shivering in the cold.

Blankets can assure your pet a good nights rest uninterrupted by the weather. They sleep with a greater sense of comfort and security. That is more that what most pet owners could ask for.

You will find out that pets easily warm up to their blankets. They learn to use them instinctively, draping themselves when it gets too cold, and snuggling in them for warmth. And since it is personalized, no one else gets a crack at the blanket – it’s theirs.

In cold temperatures, the blanket would certainly make a great team with a pet bed warmer to help distribute body warmth better. Your pet’s bed is never complete without one.

3. Blankets can be tailor made for your pet. If your pet likes its blanket heavy-duty warm, then you can get them a blanket that does this. If your pet loves to laze on soft cushions and velvety smooth lambskin or chenille, then you can get them that too. There is so much choice on the pet supplies market that you will never be at a loss for choices for your pet.

4. Pet blankets are usually easy to clean. You could look for pet blankets that do not soil as easily. Unlike in the olden days, people are no longer restricted to plain cotton or wool. Technology has made great leaps and bounds towards creating materials that fit the specific needs of pets and pet owners.

These blankets are durable. They keep the pet warm. And they also are very easy to maintain and clean. What more could you ask for in a pet supply that is definitely a must in your home?